Fore Note: Below are a couple of stories that you probably haven't seen or heard in the press. On August 11th, an unarmed, 20 year old, white/Hispanic man was shot and killed by a black police officer in Salt Lake City. Where's Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson? What a difference in media coverage of the shooting in Missouri.

Family of man fatally shot by Salt Lake City police want justice

(KUTV) A day after Salt Lake City police shot and killed a man whose family claim he was unarmed, questions about the shooting remain unanswered.

South Salt Lake police are investigating the shooting because it occurred within the city, but near the border with Salt Lake City. Officers have not yet said whether they recovered a weapon at the scene.

"They're here to protect and serve. More like shoot and kill," said Jerrail Taylor, Dillon Taylor's older brother. "Anybody in this house or anybody on the streets, if we kill someone, we're doing 25 years to life in prison. I'd like this cop to lose his job and do the same amount of time like a regular human being."

Dillon Taylor, 20, who is from Salt Lake, was exiting 7-Eleven with his brother and cousin, Adam Thayne, around 7 p.m. on Monday, when Salt Lake City police arrived, responding to a report of a man waving a gun in the area.

The officers ordered the men to the ground. Two of them complied, but Dillon, who police say matched the suspect's description, did not go down.

"It came in as a 911 call that there was a man with a gun," said South Salt Lake Police Sgt. Darrin Sweeten. "He was verbally challenged and ultimately was shot."

Sweeten did not release further details on the shooting on Tuesday.

Dillon's brother and cousin claim they were on their way to visit his parents' graves and that Dillon was surprised by the police presence. He was not aggressive, they said.

"He had headphones in, and he couldn't hear [anything], and then they finally surrounded him," Jerrail said. "They're like, 'Get on the ground,' and [he] pulled up his pants and [they] shot him."

Thayne believes police might have thought his cousin was reaching for a gun when, in reality, he grabbed his cell phone.

"I was in shock, because he was wearing a white t-shirt and there was blood all over it," Thayne said. "They ran up and handcuffed him. He wasn't moving."

A witness's video shows police yelling for the two men to remain on the ground as Thayne repeatedly screams that they have shot his cousin.

The two men were taken to the police station, but released hours later without being charged or cited.

Family said Dillon had had struggles throughout his teenage and adult life, including a criminal past, after losing his parents at the age of 12.

They hope to remember him as a loyal friend and devoted father-to-be. His girlfriend is just a couple months pregnant, Jerrail said.

"He was the funniest kid ever," Jerrail said. "His own baby will never meet him."

The family has set up an account to help pay for funeral expenses. Wells Fargo Bank is accepting donations to the "Justice for Dillon" account #6386866385.

Family and friends are planning a vigil at 7 p.m. at the 7-Eleven where he died.


Salt Lake officer captured Dillon Taylor shooting on body camera

SALT LAKE CITY The police officer who shot and killed Dillon Taylor captured the incident on his body camera, Salt Lake City Police Chief Chris Burbank said Tuesday.

Burbank said the video, along with the name of the officer, will be released to the public at the "appropriate" time. He said he didn't know if that would be days, weeks or months.

"It would be wholly inappropriate to take the most vital piece of evidence that we have and put it out to the public prior to the officer having some due process," he told reporters.

The officer's body camera recorded the entire incident, including the point when the officer shoots Taylor, Burbank said.

Burbank has watched the video but would not comment on whether he thought the Aug. 11 shooting in a 7-Eleven parking lot was justified. Burbank also would not comment on whether the 20-year-old Taylor had a gun. The man's family has said he was not armed.

Taylor's aunt, Gina Thayne, said Tuesday that police know they "killed an innocent kid."

"If in fact they actually produce a tape, it will show exactly what happened," Thayne said. "It will come out eventually. It will never bring Dillon back, though."

Taylor's friends and family protested his death and demanded answers from police Monday in a rally across the street from the Public Safety Building.

Another demonstration is planned for Wednesday night outside the Wallace F. Bennett Federal Building for not only Taylor but also for Michael Brown, the unarmed teenager police shot and killed in Ferguson, Missouri.

That shooting has ignited violent protests in the small town outside St. Louis where racial tensions have boiled over, leading to clashes between demonstrators and police.

"I cannot stress enough that this is not Ferguson," Burbank said, declining to compare the two incidents.

The chief also addressed speculation about the ethnicity of the officer who shot Taylor, saying the officer is not white. Taylor's brother, Jerrail Taylor, raised issues last week about racial profiling. He said his brother was Hispanic.

Five agencies and boards, including the South Salt Lake Police Department, Salt Lake County District Attorney's Office and Salt Lake City Police Civilian Review Board, are investigating the officer's actions, Burbank said.

"I do not send officers out to use deadly force. That's never our intention. In fact, our policy specifically says that is the last resort," he said. "The officer in this circumstance did not set out to use deadly force. We have an unfortunate incident where Dillon Taylor lost his life."

Police have said officers responded to a report of a man "waving a gun around." When police arrived, they found three men leaving the convenience store. One of the men, later identified as Taylor, reportedly matched the description of the man reported in a 911 call.

South Salt Lake Police Sgt. Darin Sweeten said three officers gave Taylor verbal commands to reveal his hands, but Taylor failed to comply and was "visibly upset." Taylor was subsequently shot and died at the scene.

Body cameras are becoming more common among Salt Lake police officers. Currently, 125 officers wear the cameras, and that number will increase to 259 by the end of September, according to the department.

Burbank said he committed to make the videos available to the public when he started the program about two years ago.

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8/21/14